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Main articles: Entities, Objects

Kelp

Kelp is a cloth life form that looks like tall grass of various sizes, usually growing in patches. It is also known as Algae, Banners, Ribbons, Reeds, Seaweed or Streamers.

Occurrence, appearance, behavior[]

The Kelp are longer and sometimes thinner then other Banners. They are normally a group of longer and smaller cloth.

Kelp is found in the Underground, Snow and Paradise level, while normal banners are in every level and are often used to activate things.

Common Kelp[]

The majority of kelp found throughout the game consists of patches of long, straight cloth of varying width and length. This type could be considered "common" kelp.

Rare Kelp[]

Another type of kelp can be seen occasionally, which looks like a vertical chain of short cloth segments pointing slightly outwards, somewhat similar to real-world seaweed. A few instances of this rare variety can be found in Underground. They are also found in Paradise.

Baby Kelp[]

At the end of the Underground level, to the right from the meditation platform, there is a tiny kelp patch with one red and one white cloth offshoot.

They will glow when touched or chirped at (they even have tiny symbols on them!) but they do not recharge your scarf. They are also known as Gary and Larry.

Interaction[]

  • All cloth in Journey will recharge your scarf (flying power); the only exception is Baby Kelp which will glow but won't recharge the scarf.
  • Kelp will light up when you chirp at them, but they won't react like other creatures. You can move them a bit with your body

Community names[]

Trivia[]

  • White Baby Kelp is the only white cloth life form other than the traveler and the Wardrobe banners.
  • Some smaller patches that look like kelp in the Snow level are actually tails of the carpet creatures that froze and fell from the sky.

Quotes[]

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See also[]

References[]

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